Things to bring for a successful winterover

"In Antarctica, no sex is okay, but I miss my motorbike and my boat."    — Taz (2005).
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Personal stuff


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Arno skiing on the blue ice of the continent, near D-10.

Left: Arno skiing on the blue ice of the continent, near D-10. Purchase this image on a royalty-free CD archive compilation

Even though the weight allotment is limited, people take the oddest things with them on winterovers. During my first winterover, the plummer brought sail and mast and then proceeded to build a snow yatch out of steel tubes. It was so heavy that it never managed to move an inch and he was too afraid to try it when the wind was strong anyway.

Keep in mind that the weight allotments vary depending on your destination. You can sometimes cheat by putting some of your stuff in official work equipment ("no, that's not a vibrator, that's a... mixer for ice chemistry experiments!"). Also you won't want to take the same kind of things inland, on the shore or on temporary and uncomfotable field camps. Some stations don't care much about the weight limits. Others do.

Also keep in mind that personnal stuff must be sent some time ahead, up to 2 or 3 months, and the same way it shows up late when you get back home. So if you send your computer ahead, you won't have it for 6 months or so; plan ahead. Some stuff can be mailed to you during the summer but with no guarantees (I once barely received a camera lens replacement on the very last flight of the summer).



Stuff to enjoy with others




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A welcome party for Laurence de la Ferriere after crossing half of the continent in 2000.

And more specifically for the midwinter

Right: A welcome party for Laurence de la Ferriere after crossing half of the continent in 2000.

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